Today Is Our Birthday And My Friends Said Nobody Will Share My Birthday Photo, Because Of Our Condition

Viewers have praised ‘inspirational’ conjoined twins who refused to be separated as they appeared on Channel 4’s Two‌ ‌Sisters,‌ ‌One‌ ‌Body‌ last night.

The documentary follows Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita, 18, from Connecticut, as they prepare to leave school and navigate adulthood – which includes learning to drive.

The sisters, who are joined at the abdomen‌, were only expected to survive for three days after they were born in 2002, and have been told that their separation could result in their death or years of intensive care.

So instead, the Mexican‌-born twins have stayed together and have expertly adapted to living life with one another – with viewers in awe of the ‘inspiration girls’ and their positive attitude.‌ 

Viewers have praised 'inspirational' conjoined twins (pictured) who refused to be separated as they appeared on Channel 4's Two‌ ‌Sisters,‌ ‌One‌ ‌Body‌ last night

Viewers have praised ‘inspirational’ conjoined twins (pictured) who refused to be separated as they appeared on Channel 4’s Two‌ ‌Sisters,‌ ‌One‌ ‌Body‌ last night

The documentary follows Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita, 18, from Connecticut, as they prepare to leave school and navigate adulthood - which includes learning to drive (pictured)

The documentary follows Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita, 18, from Connecticut, as they prepare to leave school and navigate adulthood – which includes learning to drive (pictured)

The Mexican‌-born twins have stayed together and have expertly adapted to living life with one another - with viewers (above) in awe of the 'inspiration girls' and their positive attitude

The Mexican‌-born twins have stayed together and have expertly adapted to living life with one another – with viewers (above) in awe of the ‘inspiration girls’ and their positive attitude

One person tweeted: ‘What an inspirational pair are Carmen and Lupita #twosistersonebody on @Channel4. Love them!’

Another said: ‘So‌ ‌inspirational,‌ ‌they‌ ‌don’t‌ ‌see‌ ‌Impossible.‌ ‌They‌ ‌see‌ ‌I’m‌ ‌Possible‌ ‌or‌ ‌we‌ are‌ ‌Possible.‌ ‌#twosistersonebody.’

A third wrote: ‘Amazing‌ ‌story!!‌ ‌Heartwarming!!‌ ‌inspirational,’ while one viewer called Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita‌ ‌’incredible‌’. 

During the episode, Carmen is seen being taught how to drive by the twins’ father, explaining: ‘Yeah, that’s right. Conjoined twins can drive. At least, I hope so.’

Reaction: Channel 4 viewers (above) were quick to praise the conjoined twins on Twitter for their positive attitude during the documentary

Reaction: Channel 4 viewers (above) were quick to praise the conjoined twins on Twitter for their positive attitude during the documentary

The sisters (pictured), who are joined at the abdomen‌, were only expected to survive for three days after they were born in 2002

The sisters (pictured), who are joined at the abdomen‌, were only expected to survive for three days after they were born in 2002

The pair (seen above recently) have been told that their separation could result in their death or years of intensive care

The pair (seen above recently) have been told that their separation could result in their death or years of intensive care

Lupita reveals: Carmen wants to get her license soon, so we can be more independent… I put the turn signals on and that’s pretty much it.’  

What are conjoined twins? 

Conjoined twins occur when siblings have their skin or internal organs fused together. It affects around one in 200,000 live births.

Conjoined twins are caused by a fertilised egg beginning to split into two embryos a few weeks after conception, but the process stops before it is complete.

The most common type is twins joined at the chest or abdomen. Separation surgery success depends on where the twins are joined.

Doctors can only tell which organs the siblings share, and therefore plan surgery, after they are born.

Omphalopagus twins are joined near the belly button and often share a liver but generally do not share a heart. 

Sources: Mayo Clinic and University of Maryland Medical Center

Carmen says: ‘I have the right leg, I’m a little bit taller than her – not by much – we tried letting her drive, like hold the steering wheel once and it didn’t really work.

‘And my father wanted us to do my right arm and her right arm but that also didn’t work so I just do it myself. It’s been a lot of trial and error.’ 

While most of the time the twins showcase a cheery personality, the documentary takes a moving turn when the girls share their experiences with being Mexican‌ ‌immigrants‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌US‌. 

Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita‌ ‌have‌ ‌lived‌ ‌in‌ ‌Connecticut‌ ‌since‌ ‌they‌ ‌were‌ ‌two‌, but express their fears about being deported. 

Viewers were moved by the emotional scenes, with one writing: ‘They‌ ‌literally‌ ‌just‌ ‌said‌ ‌it’s‌ ‌worse‌ ‌being‌ ‌a‌ ‌Mexican‌ ‌immigrant‌ ‌in‌ ‌American‌ ‌than‌ ‌being‌ ‌conjoined‌ ‌and‌ ‌facing‌ ‌some‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌ rarest‌ ‌medical‌ ‌complications‌ ‌and‌ ‌adversity‌ ‌known‌ ‌to‌ ‌man.’ 

‘This is absolutely breaking me,’ another person wrote. ‘They are the most beautiful girls I’ve ever seen…when they get upset I’m in bits #TwoSistersOneBody.’ 

Lupita and Carmen are omphalopagus twins, which make up 10 percent of all conjoined twins – it means each of the girls has a separate heart, a set of arms, a set of lungs and a stomach.

During the episode, Carmen is seen being taught how to drive by the twins' father, explaining: 'Yeah, that's right. Conjoined twins can drive. At least, I hope so.' Pictured, the twins as babies

During the episode, Carmen is seen being taught how to drive by the twins’ father, explaining: ‘Yeah, that’s right. Conjoined twins can drive. At least, I hope so.’ Pictured, the twins as babies

The twins and their family (pictured) moved to the US on a medical visa when the girls were two years old in hopes that doctors could separate them, but they were told the same news they'd heard in Mexico

The twins and their family (pictured) moved to the US on a medical visa when the girls were two years old in hopes that doctors could separate them, but they were told the same news they’d heard in Mexico

Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita‌ ‌have‌ ‌lived‌ ‌in‌ ‌Connecticut‌ ‌since‌ ‌they‌ ‌were‌ ‌two‌ but express their fears about being deported in the documentary - leaving viewers feeling emotional (above)

Carmen‌ ‌and‌ ‌Lupita‌ ‌have‌ ‌lived‌ ‌in‌ ‌Connecticut‌ ‌since‌ ‌they‌ ‌were‌ ‌two‌ but express their fears about being deported in the documentary – leaving viewers feeling emotional (above)

However, they share some ribs, a liver, their circulatory system, and their digestive and reproductive systems. 

With conjoined twins, the bladder and uterus still function regularly, but one girl has control of one or both of the organs – although it is unclear in this case which girl.

When Lupita and Carmen were young, they spent years in physical therapy learning how to sit up and work together to use their legs and when they were four years old, they took their first steps together.

Doctors considered separating them, but concluded it couldn’t be done safely because they shared too many vital organs and their lower spine.

The girls have learned to live their lives in tandem but have very different personalities. Carmen (left) excels in school and had a quick wit. Lupita (right) is quieter

The girls have learned to live their lives in tandem but have very different personalities. Carmen (left) excels in school and had a quick wit. Lupita (right) is quieter

When Lupita and Carmen were young, they spent years in physical therapy learning how to sit up and work together to use their legs and when they were four years old, they took their first steps together (pictured as guests on The Tyra Banks Show in 2007)

When Lupita and Carmen were young, they spent years in physical therapy learning how to sit up and work together to use their legs and when they were four years old, they took their first steps together (pictured as guests on The Tyra Banks Show in 2007)

The girls have very different personalities. Carmen excels in school and has a quick wit while Lupita is quieter.

Carmen also loves wearing make-up and applies eyeliner and mascara, while Lupita can’t be bothered.

In school, the girls are in an agricultural program, hoping to have a career as veterinarians or in some aspect of animal husbandry.

When previously asked if they ever want to be separated, both said no because even if the surgery went well they would have years of physical therapy ahead of them.

‘And then there’s the whole psychological situation because we’ve been so used to, like, being together,’ Carmen said. ‘I don’t think there’d be a point.’ 

Source: Daily Mail australia

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